Bu Daha Başlangıç
Bu Daha Başlangıç
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spacettf:

Soul nebula IC1848. Taken over 3 nights, finished off the other week. 78 subs @ 6 hours 15 minutes total. by dave.parker72 on Flickr.
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kemetic-dreams:

Mobs lynched Mary Turner on May 17, 1918 in Lowndes County, Georgia because she vowed to have those responsible for killing her husband arrested. Her husband was arrested in connection with the shooting and killing Hampton Smith, a white farmer for whom the couple had worked, and for wounding his wife. Sidney Johnson. a Black man, apparently killed Smith because he was tired of the farmer’s abuse. Unable to find Johnson. the killers lynched eight other Blacks Including Hayes Turner and his wife Mary. The mob hanged Mary by her feet, poured gasoline and oil on her and set fire to her body. One white man sliced her open and Mrs. Turner’s baby tumbled to the ground with a “little cry” and the mob stomped the baby to death and sprayed bullets into Mary Turner. (NAACP: Thirty Years of Lynching in the U.S. 1889-1918 )
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denlart:

http://denlartGAME.com │House sparrow —> http://denlart.com/?p=5660
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mstrkrftz:

 Beautiful island on lake Bled in Triglav national park | Domen Grögl
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ozcanyuksek:

Umudumuz Anadolu. Ağrı’da Magma pankartını tutan iki kızı hep birlikte ziyaret edeceğiz bir gün.
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earthstory:

REFRIGERATOR TREESFound along the North American coastline from British Columbia to Baja California, Pacific madrone trees (Arbutus menziesii) are well known for their beauty, but more often are known for being cold to the touch. The madrone tree’s bark makes it easily identified, with smooth orange-red bark that peels and curls as it ages, and eventually falls off, leaving its inner bark (often a pale green) bare and visible. Even on hot days, madrones still feel cool due to water running upwards in the trunk just beneath the bark layer. Often also referred to as madrona, bearberry, or sometimes strawberry trees, madrone trees (and in particular, their bark) have been historically used to treat a variety of diseases by Native Americans, and are still used to make flavorings and tea. They, like other trees, require fire to germinate, and even hold an advantage during times of intermittent fires, due to their ability to survive fire and regenerate more quickly than some of their conifer neighbors, like Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Madrone trees are also known to be excellent for their assistance in erosion control, as their roots spread widely and quickly, holding soil in place along the erosion-prone West coast of North America. All around, pretty cool trees… pun certainly intended. BNPhoto Credit: Randell Zerr, as hosted by http://www.nps.gov/bibe/photosmultimedia/Plants-and-Animals.htmFurther Resources:http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_arme.pdfhttp://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/pugetsound/species/madrone.htmlIntroduction to Trees of the San Francisco Bay Region. 2002. Glenn Keator. University of California Press
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best-of-imgur:

How To Give a Sharp Whistle (I’ve always wanted to learn this)http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com
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america-wakiewakie:

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future | Warrior Publications 

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.
Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.
Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.
The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.
(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)
america-wakiewakie:

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future | Warrior Publications 

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.
Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.
Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.
The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.
(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)
america-wakiewakie:

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future | Warrior Publications 

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.
Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.
Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.
The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.
(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)
america-wakiewakie:

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future | Warrior Publications 

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.
Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.
Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.
The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.
(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)
america-wakiewakie:

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future | Warrior Publications 

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.
Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.
Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.
The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.
(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)
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musts:

© Gabriela Ileana Iacobuta
Hill Inlet - Whitehaven Beach, Whitsunday Islands, Australia
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reddit-news:

War-torn Iraq facing massive refugee crisis http://ift.tt/1nyxoHe